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Armed & Squatting Facts

When approaching hostile suspects, Troopers are often armed with a yellow Taser.

When approaching hostile suspects, Troopers are often armed with a yellow Taser. (View larger version)

Photograph by Jason McConnehey/ PSG Films

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  • The Alaska State Troopers maintain a missing persons database called the Missing Persons Clearinghouse. It keeps track of everyone who is reported missing in Alaska.

  • In 2011, 2,071 people were reported missing in Alaska. Slightly less than 68 percent of the cases were minors reported as runaways, and missing adults were the second largest component, at nearly 29 percent.

  • Alaska rivers like the Kenai are popular for fishing the great king salmon. But fishermen must snag the fish in the mouth. Snagging in the tail, back or side is not legal.

  • Alaska’s Wildlife Troopers work 12-14 hour days to enforce fishing regulations on the popular Kenai River.

  • Alaska’s Seward Highway is renowned for its scenery. But because drivers can easily become distracted by the beauty, the highway has a high incident of crashes.

  • A 2012 Alaska Division of Public Health report found that accidental death was the third most common cause of death among Alaskans. The first two most common causes of death are cancers and heart diseases.

  • At 127 miles long, the Seward Highway connects Anchorage to Seward, and is designed a USDA Forest Service Scenic Byway.

  • The first 50 miles of the Seward Highway travels along the base of the Chugach Mountains and the shore of Turnagain Arm, where visitors can spot beluga whales, Dall sheep, and eagles. The remainder of the drive runs through the mountains, offering beautiful views of wild Alaska.

  • Summit Lake is accessible from the Seward Highway, and swans rest on the lake during their spring and fall migrations.

  • As of 2012, there are seven Alaska State Trooper canine teams in service.

  • Grayling, Alaska, has just under 200 residents. It sits on the west bank of the Yukon River and is east of the Nulato Hills.

  • Subsistence activities like fishing, hunting, trapping, and berry gathering are vital for Grayling’s economy. Residents harvest salmon, waterfowl, moose, black bear and small game.

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