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Meth, Knives, and Spears Facts

Trooper Wyatt Derner holds up a meth pipe. In 1943, meth was used to treat many disorders, including narcolepsy, depression, obesity, alcoholism, and ADHD. It was also used during World War II as a way to keep soldiers more alert.

Trooper Wyatt Derner holds up a meth pipe. In 1943, meth was used to treat many disorders, including narcolepsy, depression, obesity, alcoholism, and ADHD. It was also used during World War II as a way to keep soldiers more alert. (View larger version)

Photograph by PSG Films

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  • In 1943, meth was used to treat many disorders, including narcolepsy, depression, obesity, alcoholism, and ADHD. It was also used during World War II as a way to keep soldiers more alert.

  • Prolonged use of meth can lead to sleeplessness, loss of appetite, increased blood pressure, paranoia, psychosis, aggression, disordered thinking, extreme mood swings, and hallucinations.

  • Pharmaceutical meth is still available legally under a brand name, and it’s sometimes prescribed to treat severe obesity, narcolepsy, and ADHD.

  • Withdrawals from heroin can result in restlessness, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes, and muscles and bone pain. Sudden withdrawal by heavy users who are in poor health can be fatal.

  • An estimated 16 million people in the world use heroin and opium.

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death among Alaskan Natives and Native Americans between the ages of 15 to 34.

  • In 2010, Alaska had the second highest suicide rate in the U.S.

  • Approximately 4 times more men than women commit suicide.

  • The Palmer Hay Flats State Game Refuge protects 28,800 acres of wetlands, birch forests, tidal sloughs and mudflats, and lakes and streams.

  • On their migration to northern breeding grounds, tens of thousands of ducks and other birds arrive at the Palmer Hay Flats State Game Refuge from mid-April through May.

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