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Shark Attack Facts

Reenactment: The captain baits the water and it doesn't take long to catch the shark's attention.  She smells blood instantly.  Her olfactory sense is so powerful nearly one third of her brain does nothing but process scents.

Reenactment: The captain baits the water and it doesn't take long to catch the shark's attention. She smells blood instantly. Her olfactory sense is so powerful nearly one third of her brain does nothing but process scents. (View larger version)

Photograph by National History New Zealand

Published


    Shark Bursts Through Cage

  • The Great White is the most genetically diverse species of shark.

  • People spent $314 million on shark ecotourism annually; and one study projects that will increase to $780 million in the next 20 years.

  • At birth, a Great White shark is already 5 feet long!

  • Guadalupe Island, where this video was filmed, is famous for the Guadalupe Fur Seal; the Great White sharks may gather there to eat the seals.

  • A University of Florida study shows that worldwide, shark attack fatalities have been on the rise, though they are falling in the United States.

  • Rattlesnake Bites Gardening Woman

  • The lethality of Western Diamondback Rattlesnake venom actually varies depending on where the snake is from. Snakes from the southwest portion of the species’ range are more poisonous than ones from the northeast portion.

  • Younger snakes are also more poisonous.

  • The first rattlesnake antivenom in the U.S. was sold in 1953. Antivenoms were developed from vaccine research in the early 20th century.

  • This incident occurred in Tucson, Arizona – the nearest major league baseball team is named the Diamondbacks, and features the rattlesnake as their logo.

  • Tucson is located in the Sonoran desert, the only place the famous saguaro cactus grows.


  • Snowmobiler Caught in Avalanche

  • The Canadian military has developed a $620,000 stealth snowmobile called the “Loki.”

  • Some avalanches are so powerful, that they actually form craters in the ground, which later fill with water and become ponds called “impact pools.”

  • The first mass-produced snowmobile was the Ski-Doo, originally marketed in 1959 by the J.A. Bombardier company.

  • In 1970, the deadliest avalanche on record killed 20,000 people in the towns of Yungay and Ranrahirca, Peru.

  • 90% of all avalanches involving people are triggered by those people.