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Get to Know the Practical Preppers, Scott Hunt and David Kobler

David Kobler and Scott Hunt. 

David Kobler and Scott Hunt.  (View larger version)

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In some ways, Scott Hunt and David Kobler couldn’t be more different. Hunt, an engineer who now runs a working farm in South Carolina, has the glib charm and calm, reassuring wisdom of someone who spent a decade as a pastor to a non-denominational congregation. In contrast, Kobler, a U.S. Army veteran who experienced harrowing door-to-door urban combat in Iraq, is soft-spoken and tends toward the laconic. When he talks, his lingo is laced with military acronyms and references to grisly-sounding terms such as “kill zone.”

“I’m the boring infrastructure guy,” Hunt explains. “David focuses upon security, and threats. I’m the one who’s concerned about making sure you can get a hot shower. But when you’re in a crisis situation, you don’t realize how important that can be.”

Yet both men’s contrasting training, experience, and skills complement one another when it comes to advising people on how to systematically prepare to survive cataclysmic disasters, ranging from devastating hurricanes to more protracted crises, such as a massive electromagnetic attack that might wreak havoc upon our technological infrastructure, paralyze government and cause the collapse of order.

Beyond that, Hunt and Kobler seem to share a common philosophy. While many in the prepper subculture seem fixated upon conspiracy theories that predict very specific scenarios for upheaval, neither man seems inclined toward such gloomy predictions. Instead, they preach the importance of flexible preparedness that would enable people to survive a broad range of challenges--from the short-term disruptions frequently caused by weather, to so-called “black swan” events, the rare cataclysmic extremes that may catch a society off guard because they seem so unlikely.

“What we promote are solutions that are identical for every scenario,” Hunt explains. “No matter what you are preparing for, you need to do the same things—determine what resources you have, establish your network of people who can rely upon one another, set up your preparations, develop the variety of skills you’ll need. When people don’t have things when a disaster occurs, in a short period of time, they become paralyzed. If you’re not prepared, you will freak out.”

Hunt, a jack-of-all trades whose talents range from welding and fixing machinery to raising cattle, says he learned that versatility growing up in a small town in upstate New York, where his father was an auto body mechanic, and his extended family circle included loggers, carpenters, and other people with hands-on expertise. From an early age, “I had to help out with all that stuff,” he recalls. “And oddly, all the things I hated to do as a teenager taught me the skills that I use now. I worked on a dairy farm for five years. I’ve done building, construction work, you name it.”

Hunt’s real-world experience as a youth stimulated his curiosity about how things worked, which led to him to pursue an engineering degree at the prestigious Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, which bills itself as “the nation’s oldest technological university.” While in school, he helped support himself by working as an assistant to kinetic sculptor George Rickey, doing welding and fabrication. That gig afforded him the chance to travel to Germany and Japan to work on Rickey’s installations.

After graduating from RPI in 1992, Hunt spent a decade working as an engineer for tire manufacturer Michelin, and then did a stint as a pastor, which appealed to his altruistic urges. But all the while, Hunt also kept getting his hands dirty. He, his wife and four children made their home on a farm in South Carolina, where Hunt could freely engage in his other passion of developing a largely self-sufficient, sustainable lifestyle, in which he provided his family’s own food, water, power and other needs. “I always wanted to see if I could live independent of the system,” he explains. Eventually, others’ curiosity about the systems he developed for providing water and other resources led him to start yet another career as a prepper consultant.

Along the way, he met Kobler, who came by the farm one day with a friend to help on a construction project. Like Hunt, Kobler is a transplanted upstate New Yorker, and lived in both a small town and in inner-city Buffalo. From the time he was young, his big passion was wilderness survival. “In high school, on Friday nights most people would go to the football games,” he recalls. “I and a couple of buddies would go off to the mountains and spend the weekend doing primitive camping. We’d take hardly any supplies, maybe just a tent and a tarp or poncho. We wanted to learn to live off the land.”

Kobler briefly studied criminal justice in college, before his love of practical hands-on work led him to take a job as a maintenance worker in a local school district. “I’m not an engineer, but I like building things,” he explains. “I’ve done carpentry, built wooden structures.” Then, in 2000, he decided to follow an old family tradition, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. “We have a long history of serving,” he says. “My grandfather was at Pearl Harbor. I felt that same call, and decided to follow my dream.”

Kobler rose to the rank of staff sergeant during his seven-year stint in the 101st Airborne Division, and in the spring of 2003, served in one of the units that spearheaded the invasion of Iraq. It was an experience that put his survivalist skills and ingenuity to good use. “We were out so far ahead that we didn’t have a supply train keeping up with us,” Kobler recalled. “We commandeered Iraqi vehicles to move us. We’d take flatbed semis and put our equipment on them.” After racing through the desert, Kobler and his squad battled Iraqi forces and insurgents in cities such as Baghdad and Fallujah.

Those experiences not only honed Kobler’s skills with weaponry and hand-to-hand fighting, but also gave him a sense of how quickly law and order might disintegrate in a catastrophe. “Criminals suddenly came out, to take advantage of the confusion,” he recalls. “We also saw a lot of revenge killings, in which people capitalized on the situation to settle old grudges.” In a worst-case scenario, he warns, a collapse of American society “would look like Iraq.”

After an injury compelled Kobler to retire from the military, he ended up in South Carolina, where he met Hunt and got the inspiration to apply his training to working with preppers.

18 comments
CLIFTON TIGERT
CLIFTON TIGERT

The doomsday scenario I anticipate is one of mass chaos created by our failing economic system. The US monetary system collapses with money worth virtually 0 and the freebies, welfare, food stamps, Lone Star Card, and free healthcare will cease to exist. Mass chaos will ensue and you better be prepared to protect your own, probably several families banded together. Must have a sustainable and continuous food supply, aquaponics, chickens and laying hens, rabbits, and of course a garden. Remember Vitamin C depletion - Scurvy is a slow and painful death due to absence of Vitamin C. A clean water source - better have bleach and powdered or pressed swimming pool bleach to disinfect your water. Bottled bleach is good for short time, but looses strength over time and is rendered virtually useless after 2-3 years and keep it out of the elements. Bad wells and fresh water can contain killer bacteria. Guns and ammo are a must and be prepared to know how to use them during the worst of situations. All this created by what the "elite" who consider earth overpopulation is in need of a major adjustment, probably down to 400-500 million people.  

Tango Maniac
Tango Maniac

anyone know where to get that pressure sealing portable toilet from season 1 ep 10 BARRY AND PINK???

Matt Huston
Matt Huston

I'm sure this has been discussed, but why not do an episode of planned marauders, who have nefarious intent when it all goes down? They would scare the heck out of viewers with a bandana'ed warped voice? Ratings ? ^


R Mont
R Mont

David,,


CSM here.  Interested in talking to you about consulting work.  Find me on FB


NFS

R Mont
R Mont

David and Scott,


I was your CSM in Iraq.  I'm interested in 'consultant' work assisting others in prepping or possibly working with you.  I see a lot of errors, small and large, not addressed on the show (I know your comments are limited and sometimes rarely accepted).  Please contact me on Facebook- David I know you know my first name...

Cheers

Michael Murphy
Michael Murphy

Heard ad on Rush today about highcomsecurity.com. The videos were pretty cool! They manufacture ballistic armor and panel inserts. The ad on Rush said civilians could buy at 25% discount using "Armor" as the discount code. I ordered panels for my backpack and an active shooter kit for high velocity rifle rounds.

Do you know this company??? They have made a million armor plates for military to Iraq and Afghanistan for vest manufacturers.

Thanks, Murph

tim smith
tim smith

I just watched the last episode.  While there may be checks and balances in the government, they are not in the favor of the people.  I really believe you are wrong and that a Civil War is imminent.  It is closer than anyone can imagine.  I know in our region the stock piles of weapons and ammunition is so extreme you could and would not believe it.

Now I know that this is your opinion and are well entitled to it, but I think you should see what is actually going on in communities before just dismissing certain things to it just cannot happen.

Mitchell Brigman
Mitchell Brigman

i sit around all day thinking allittle like u guys but i see when u rate people on there survial ideas,,,i have some crazy but really good ideas on betteing  there bunkers and surival please answer back if u would like to here some of them,,,,,,,,,brigman_mitchell@yahoo.com


Danny Lamb
Danny Lamb

I served in the Navy,worked as a firefighter and live in California(earthquake country).Love the show,but,there are some really important things you are not addressing,mainly storage of food and other supplies.most people are storing water and other heavy things(canned goods) high on shelves.heavy things should be on the ground or lower shelves,light things on upper shelves.some people store gas and propane in the same area(could lose food and other supplies to fire),flammables should be stored elsewhere.also the storage of food in glass,in a bad earthquake you will probally lose everything,then you would be up the creek without a paddle.also the use of free standing shelves is another problem,everything should be solidly anchored to the ground,walls and ceilings if possible.these things are just as important if not more then stockpiling supplies.While on the Kitty Hawk we were in 50 ft. seas,I went to a storage space to get aircraft tires,I was almost hit by a 300 lb. a/c tire that wasn't stored correctly,took 3 days to straighten out several storage areas. 

Tom Stoner
Tom Stoner

Gentlemen,

My name is Dr Tom Stoner and I will be attending and speaking at the Colorado Doomsday expo.

I am co owner of TSSP Inc and we provide medical survival and prepper counsel as well as true medical kits.

Would we be able to touch base before the June Expo.

Tom

mike greco
mike greco

I started prepping about 6 months ago I would like to talk to other preppers to learn as much as I can maybe become friend as well  so if any one would like to talk about prepping email me mgreco17@yahoo.com talk to you later

George Jungle
George Jungle

power mustbe your weaknees,,1st a car alt must turn at least 1,000 rpm or you'll have a battery DIScharger & with an emp solar panels will be 1st to fail,,love the show any way

Christine Marrier
Christine Marrier

Hi David and Scott,

                              I've been trying to think of a way to  learn how to barter with everyone, you know working together in order to survive the worst.   However, to start with I live in a not so good area and I'm hoping that my fiancee and I can move out quick and into a better place but I like to be prepared now.    We live in an apartment complex - side by side apartments attatched.    How do you know or find out more about your neighbors?   You can't just trust someone without knowing everything these days.   Futhermore,  I've been trying to get my fiancee to prepare and get with the program but he's not into it.  Is there anyways you can give me any ideas.?    I hope I'm wrong but I feel strongly that the US is going to be hit soon.   I can't explain the feeling but it's an awful feeling.   Is there any material out there to help the less fortunate prepare in small apartments with miminal money?

Mitchell Brigman
Mitchell Brigman

@mike greco  sir i sit all day thinking on ways to improve preppers bunkers etc,,would love to dicsuse my ideas with u 

Yvonne Ga
Yvonne Ga

@Christine Marrier Hello.... Yes how DO the less fortunate prepare?....  Help us also.... Thank you!....  We want to survive.... how about people with pets?.... Help with that?....

Joe M.
Joe M.

@Christine Marrier 

Hello Christine, I cannot speak for your area but I allow city dwellers to prepare on my property. My small farm is a bug-out location. It began with being part of an emergency assistance group and some of these people were urban-bound with nowhere to bug-out to. Perhaps this is a concept to build on. aar6qh@yahoo.com

Yvonne Ga
Yvonne Ga

@Christine Marrier  yes... and Scott and David.... how did you start to offer your experience to the "world"....  I am very interested and how are you the "experts".... You both interest me.....