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None of the Above Quiz

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Do you think you know how science actually works? In this quiz, you are the experiment! Test your knowledge of scientific curiosities. 

2 comments
Philip Park
Philip Park

Experiment: How many logs does it take to have one complete off the edge?

In the experiment above on the show, Tim Shaw asked how many logs would it take. On the show, Tim reveals that it takes a minimum of 4 logs due to its center of gravity. I believe it can be done by three.

How: First log hanging less than half way off the edge. Second log sitting on the end of the first log perpendicularly. Third log sitting on the other end of the first log perpendicularly as well.

This would look like a capital “I” from plan view (above) with one of the end logs complete of the edge of the pool.

Explained: This essentially creates a “see-saw” with one side having more downward force due to a longer moment arm. The axis would be the end of the pool.  This is all assuming at the logs are all uniform in weight. 

Vicki Deitrick
Vicki Deitrick

episode: Defying Gravity


Tim Shaw explained the exploding watermelon by saying water conducts electricity. H2O does NOT conduct electricity. In a watermelon, I assume the sugar conducts electricity. In a pool or another body of water it is the impurities or additives that conduct electricity, NOT water.