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Extreme Eats

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A young girl cutting meat on plate with fries. Today in France, especially in the Camargue in the south where herds of wild horses dashing through water is a photographic cliche, some breeds are raised for meat and as is true of most meat sources, the young, the colts, are preferred for their tenderness. Easily digested, horsemeat has fewer calories than beefÑ94 per hundred milligrams, compared with 156 for lean beef.

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Food is a universal need, but what we find appetizing is not. Tradition, religion, social status and affluence can influence our tastes. And in the world of extreme cuisine, one person's meat can truly be another person's poison. In this episode of Taboo, we'll experience some of mankind's forbidden foods. Whether it's feasting on the world's largest spider, devouring duck embryo, munching on animal penis -- when it comes to cuisine, taste is in the mouth of the beholder.

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