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Facts: The Truth Behind: The Legend of King Arthur

Photo: The ruins of Wroxeter Roman Town

Photo: The ruins of Wroxeter Roman Town (View larger version)

Photo by: Zig Zag Productions and Ross Goodlass

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  • The round table at Winchester was in fact made by Edward III; it was repainted by Henry VIII in the 1500s depicting Henry at the top of the table as the legendary Arthur.

  • The Queen’s robbing room in the House of Lords of the British Parliament was redecorated with Arthurian themes after the fire of 1834, which required Parliament to be rebuilt.

  • Monks at Glastonbury Abbey in the 1100s reportedly discovered two bodies buried in the abbey. One was a man, the other a woman with still-intact golden hair. A lead cross was also claimed to have been found that proclaimed the bodies to be that of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere.

  • The 12th-century writer Geoffrey of Monmouth was the first to put down into prose the legend of Arthur.

  • King Arthur is not only a British hero, but also has links to France, Iceland, Italy, Norway, and Hungry, proving how powerful the legend is.

  • One theory of the origins of King Arthur suggests that he actually derived from the Celtic bear god Artos.

3 comments
Ginni Carrel
Ginni Carrel

National Geographic doesn't know how to spell. (Hungary!!!)