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9/11: Science and Conspiracy

An Elaborate 9/11 Plan

One theory suggests rogue planes carrying explosives assumed the flight paths of the real ones. Could such a complex plan work?

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9/11: Science and Conspiracy: An Elaborate 9/11 Plan

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One theory suggests rogue planes carrying explosives assumed the flight paths of the real ones. Could such a complex plan work?

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Douglas Westfall
Douglas Westfall

The concept of the Bermuda triangle was created in 1950 with an article by Associated Press reporter Edward Van Winkle Jones. He had a map showing an airplane flying from Bermuda toward Puerto Rico, another plane flying from Puerto Rico to Miami, and finally, Flight 19 flying from Fort Lauderdale out in the direction of Bermuda. In 1952, George X Sand wrote in Fate Magazine defining the borders, shown in the map from Jones' article, In 1964 Vincent Gaddis in Argosy magazine finally named the infamous Bermuda Triangle.

It looks a triangle drawn over the Atlantic Ocean. Each year, ships and planes go missing off the eastern coastline of the United States, as planes have for a century, and ships literally for hundreds of years. Yet both the US Coast Guard and Lloyds of London state that no more ships or planes go missing here than off the Pacific coastline. 

Much of the story however, begins with Flight 19, aka the Lost Patrol when supposedly they disappeared suddenly into the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Flight 19 disappeared in December of 1945 but it wasn’t into the Bermuda triangle and it wasn't sudden — it took five hours for each of the TMB Avengers to drop out of the sky. The irony of Flight 19 is that none of the men died within the infamous Bermuda triangle. 

Three crash sites have been located and one aircraft has been raised from the sea. 

Taken from, Discovery of Flight 19
Douglas Westfall, historic publisher of American History
Specialbooks.com

Erik Deriso
Erik Deriso

Funny how WTC building 7 was not discussed at all.

Robert Soto
Robert Soto

@Erik Deriso I think because to the people talking on the subject thought it wasn't relevant to this program.