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About Henry Rollins

Photo: Henry Rollins

Photo: Henry Rollins (View larger version)

Photograph by NGT / Abigail Rodriguez

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Henry Rollins joined the Southern California band Black Flag as vocalist in 1981. Upon the demise of the legendary rock group, he formed Rollins Band and has been making records and touring the world ever since. Beyond taking the stage as a musician, Henry does speaking dates all over the world, and along with the band dates, has averaged over one hundred shows a year for over twenty-five years. His most recent Frequent Flyer spanned seven months and 14 countries.

A Grammy winner for the performance of his own book Get in the Van, Henry is not one to confine his performances strictly to the stage. He performs in movies and TV shows including Bad Boys II, Heat, and the just released The Devil’s Tomb, as host of his IFC’s The Henry Rollins Show, and season 2 of Sons of Anarchy on the FX network.

Henry recently filmed a series of documentaries for IFC, and is currently hosting his weekly LA radio show, and running 2-13-61, a publishing company he created to release books, CDs and DVDs.

Rollins’ love of animals, adventures and the stranger sides of life all collide in Nat Geo WILD’s three-part series Animal Underworld. He built a stage and screen career out of blurring the line between the social mainstream and the countercultural fringe, but this journey takes him deep into untamed territory, as he uncovers and explores animal rituals where faith trumps fear, the devout face the deadly and fascination becomes obsession.

“Americans almost instinctively will reach down and pet someone's dog, and don’t even think twice about it,” says Rollins. “But there are other people who seek a much more intense relationship with animals. I want to better understand the ancient bond between man and beast.”

Rollins circles the globe investigating the complex, dangerous and seemingly taboo relationships formed over generations between humans and some of the animal kingdom’s most unlikely inhabitants. In India, he visits snake charmers who have passed their tradition of handling deadly cobras down through generations, and walks among rats in a temple where they are revered as holy. In Vietnam, he investigates a culture where cockfighting rings remain a legal, if brutal, pastime. In the United States, he attends a congregation of Pentecostals who handle rattlesnakes and copperheads during worship services as a show of faith, and heads out on the highway in search of a meal with people who consume road kill for sustenance.

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