National Geographic Society

  • Connect:

Green Goliath Facts

A green sturgeon's face.  Outsiders arent normally allowed to handle green sturgeon, but today the Yurok tribe has granted Zeb Hogan special permission to help out.

A green sturgeon's face. Outsiders arent normally allowed to handle green sturgeon, but today the Yurok tribe has granted Zeb Hogan special permission to help out. (View larger version)

Photograph by NGT

Published
  • 11 run-of-the-river dams and over 400 dams in total, the Columbia River Basin generates more than 21 million kilowatts of hydroelectricity.

  • Instead of typical scales, white sturgeon have “scutes” which are larger modified scales for protection.

  • Located in southwest Oregon, the Rogue River covers 215 miles, beginning at Crater Lake and ending at the Pacific Ocean at Gold Beach, Oregon.

  • The gold rush hit the Rogue River Valley in the 1850’s, and prospectors immediately descended on the area, disrupting the Native American population and leading to, sometimes violent, confrontations.

  • The Rogue River offers a wide range of outdoor activities including difficult whitewater rafting, renowned salmon and steelhead fishing, and diverse wildlife observation opportunities.

  • Construction of Bonneville Dam began in 1933 under Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Public Works program and was completed in 1938.

  • 500,000 households receive their electric power from the Bonneville Dam.

  • White sturgeon are the largest freshwater fish in North America and can weigh over 1,500 pounds, be 20 feet in length, and live for over 100 years.

  • White sturgeon have maintained the same form and structure for more than 175 million years.

  • Like the green sturgeon the white sturgeon is a primitive, bottom dwelling fish.

  • Spawning typically only happens every 4-11 years.

  • The green sturgeon occupy Pacific coastal waters.

  • Green sturgeon are sometimes caught as by-catch in Pacific fisheries. Some serious threats to the species, however, are dams, dykes, water diversion, and pollution in the U.S. rivers where the fish spawn.

  • Green Sturgeon are protected by the Endangered Species Act.

  • Green Sturgeon spawning is known to take place in just three rivers in North America; these include the Rogue, Klamath, and the Sacramento rivers.

0 comments