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America's Loch Ness Monster Facts

Native Americans who resided on the west side of Lake Champlain had lore associated with a great, horned serpent. In 1873, P.T. Barnum, who was Mr. Circus, he offered $50,000 for a carcass of the Lake Champlain sea serpent and statistically, if you look at the sightings, the maximum length, the average length was 26 and a half feet.

Native Americans who resided on the west side of Lake Champlain had lore associated with a great, horned serpent. In 1873, P.T. Barnum, who was Mr. Circus, he offered $50,000 for a carcass of the Lake Champlain sea serpent and statistically, if you look at the sightings, the maximum length, the average length was 26 and a half feet. (View larger version)

Photograph by National Geographic Channels/ SNAKE OIL PRODUCTIONS/ DOUGLAS CHENEY

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  • The earliest documentation of Champ is from an entry in Samuel De Champlain’s diary in 1609 where he describes the sea serpent as having large coils and scales.

  • Some sources say that Champ has been sighted over 240 times in Lake Champlain.

  • Some people say that Champ is similar in physical structure to the plesiosaur, which is an aquatic creature from the dinosaur era that has been extinct for 65 million years.

  • Port Henry, a small town located on Lake Champlain, has its own Annual Champ Day celebration, which is on the first Saturday in August.

  • Showman P.T. Barnum posted a $50,000 reward for the hide of Champ so he could add it to his World’s Fair Show.

  • In June 2009, a man captured a video of a creature swimming along in Lake Champlain. Many believed it was Champ, while scientists said it could have been a distressed moose.

  • Following the town of Port Henry’s declaration that their waters were a safe haven for Champ, both New York and Vermont passed legislation protecting the sea serpent in the 1980’s.

  • The Native American tribe, Abenaki, have their own stories of a Champ-like creature, which they named Tatoskok.

  • The Loch Ness monster from Scotland is the best-known cousin of Champ.

  • In 1873, the New York Times reported that a railroad crew had seen the head of a large serpent in Lake Champlain, which possessed scales that shined in the sun.

  • Vermont has its own minor league baseball team called the Lake Monsters with Champ as its mascot. An estimated 3,300 fans see Champ for themselves at every game.

  • Sandra Mansi snapped a photograph in 1977 that she claims shows Champ. Many experts believe that the photograph shows only driftwood.

  • Some experts believe that Champ could simply be a very large sturgeon, an large ancient fish.

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