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Grizzly Bear Facts

Bears are built to bite. Their enormous muscles attached to the skill power jaws studded with 42 teeth. Strong enough to buite through a cast iron skillet and with enough force to crush a bowling ball.

Bears are built to bite. Their enormous muscles attached to the skill power jaws studded with 42 teeth. Strong enough to bite through a cast iron skillet and with enough force to crush a bowling ball. (View larger version)

Photograph by istockphoto

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  • Grizzly bears weigh an average of 800 pounds (363 kg). The male on average is 1.8 times as heavy as the female.

  • Grizzly cubs are born blind, toothless, almost hairless and weighing 1 pound (half a kilogram).

  • Grizzly bear milk contains up to 33 percent fat, more than that in heavy whipping cream.

  • Adult male grizzlies hibernate for as little as several weeks, while females that emerge from dens with cubs can hibernate for as long as 7 months.

  • Over winter females can lose about 40% of their bodyweight.

  • Adult grizzly males will occasionally kill grizzly bear cubs.

  • A grizzly bear’s powerful claws are up to 6 inches (15 centimeters) in length.

  • Approximately a third of all grizzly cubs die before reaching the age of two.

  • Grizzly bears can easily eat over 100 pounds of salmon in a day.

  • The grizzly bear’s sense of smell is seven times better than a bloodhound.

  • Grizzly bears have bitten through cast iron skillets.

  • A grizzly has the speed to outrun a horse for a short distance.

  • Grizzly bears have a muscular hump on the upper back, which helps differentiate them from other bears in the wild.

  • A grizzly bear has to eat almost 20,000 calories a day.

  • Adult male grizzlies are not social animals. They do not like competition for food or a female’s attention.

  • An adult bear can reach speeds of nearly 65 kilometres per hour.

  • Today, in the lower 48 United States, only about 1,500 grizzlies remain in less than 2 percent of their former range.

  • Adult grizzly bears don't climb trees because they are too big and heavy, but their cubs do. The top of a tree is a safe place for a small cub when danger is nearby.
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