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Statue of Liberty Facts

The Statue of Liberty with park police keeping watch at its base. Nearby sits the crane that hoists heavy steel into the statue.

The Statue of Liberty with park police keeping watch at its base. Nearby sits the crane that hoists heavy steel into the statue. (View larger version)

Photograph by National Geographic Channels/ Infocis Asia/ Erin Buxton

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  • The Statue of Liberty was once called Liberty Enlightening the World.

  • France presented the statue as a gift to America, marking the friendship between the countries.

  •  The statue’s feet is surrounded with broken shackles, which is unseen by many from the ground due to the pedestal’s height. It symbolizes Lady Liberty’s freedom from oppression and control.

  • The Statue was not always green. The copper that the exterior is made of was much shinier, with the characteristic copper color. The greenish-blue hue is a result of the natural oxidation of the metal, which also serves as a layer of protection against further deterioration.

  • It took about 30 years for the Statue of Liberty to change from copper brown to the greenish-blue hue it is today. Despite harsh weather conditions at Liberty Island, the copper that protects the statue has only weathered 0.005 of an inch.

  • The thickness of the copper is the same thickness as putting 2 US pennies together, 3/32ths of an inch or 2.38 mm.

  • Back in 1906, the US congress once thought that the patina was a sign of deterioration. They voted to spend around $62,000 to give the Statue of Liberty a fresh coat of varnish.

  • Between 1886 and 1902, the statue functioned as a lighthouse, the first in US to be powered by electricity. The statue’s torch could be seen approximately 24 miles out at sea.

  • 300 different types of hammers shaped the 62,000 pounds (28,100 kg) of copper that was used in the construction of the statue.

  • In 1984, the statue was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

  • The Statue of Liberty receives an average of 5 million visitors a year.

  • Following the 2001, September 11th attacks, the statue remained closed for almost 3 years, until 3rd August 2004.

  • The torch the Lady Liberty holds now is not the original torch. The original one was removed due to water leakage and it is now on display in the monument’s museum. The statue was modeled after Charlotte Bartholdi, the sculptor’s mother.
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