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Prepper Build: Underwater Cache

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Rodney Dial is crafting hefty waterproof containers that can store all his preps safely underwater where no one can reach them.

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Doomsday Preppers: Prepper Build: Underwater Cache

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Rodney Dial is crafting hefty waterproof containers that can store all his preps safely underwater where no one can reach them.

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15 comments
Geoffrey Badgley
Geoffrey Badgley

All I can say is WOW. 

i havent watch to many of these shows because they are just SOO bad it's not funny. But this guys idea to hide his stash in the ocean to save him from a tsunami has to be one of the worst I have see. 

1) stock steel doesn't do so well in saltwater. Yes I know he said it was galvanized but I'm a welder and that was stock metal tubing, even if he used galvanized steel it only gives limited protection.

2) What if he needs to get his stash in the dead of winter? Hypothermia!!

3) How is he going to open the containers? Torch and risk burn everything inside? No matter how he does it it will be a major pain.

3) A lesson in tsunamis. First thing to happen is the ocean will reseed and drag every thing on the ocean floor out to sea. Then the water comes flooding back fast and hard pushing every thing it took out back. After the tsunamis floods withdraw from land and takes every thing it can with it (ie houses and a like) NOTHING you put in the ocean will be where you left it. If a bad storm can move a massive ship wreck just imagine what it could do to a 100lb steel can.

Natgeo you should be a shamed to put such tripe on TV. How did such a respectable company fall so far

Mike Bowers
Mike Bowers

Too the people... do you think we are going to have power grid shutdown that will wipe out America as we know it

Duane George
Duane George

Did they do away with the "initial months of survival" or did I miss it?

Ron Palentchar
Ron Palentchar

Oh and Rodney..invest in safety glasses for you daughter. ; )

Ron Palentchar
Ron Palentchar

Rodney, I like the underwater idea but your triangulation method has a serious flaw. The "unique " points you are using will most likely be gone when a tsunami hits. Review the Latoya Bay Footage of the affected mountain sides. Wiped clean. Best of Luck.

Matt Hutchison
Matt Hutchison

There is no GPS to locate the cache?  Using land features is not the best option if you're prepping for a tsunami caused by an earthquake.  A tsunami will change the shoreline completely.  You also have to think about the amount of debris that will be in the water after the tsunami recedes.  The debris in the water will cause problems with your air hose while diving and will be extremely dangerous to the diver.  It won't just be objects in the water, but possibly chemicals as well.  Also, those caches will not stay put unless they are anchored by cement and a chain due to the undertow a tsunami will create, and even then they could still break loose.  You can't underestimate the power of a tsunami.  Remember, the first sign of a tsunami is all of the water receding out from shore for several hundred feet and then all of that water comes rushing back.  High ground is the best option because it's far less dangerous for the one retrieving the cache.  You're no good to your family dead.

Mike Scansaroli
Mike Scansaroli

Hmmm.... Good in theory, BUT! 

Did he verify that welding the tube shut did not damage the items inside?

How does he plan on opening them after SHTF? 

Are they water tight at depth? 

 I think he chose the wrong material for the tubes. Would have been better off with large PVC and screw on tops.

Paul W.
Paul W.

I like this as a SHTF backup plan, but I wouldn't like to use it as my main cache strategy. Depending on the scenario, it could become very hard to either retrieve the tubes or open them.  For example, in a volcanic eruption, ash can turn water extremely corrosive - not something you want to swim in.  Or should there be an EMP strong enough to disable anything electronic (i.e. welders) getting these open would require a cutting torch, which would likely destroy the contents.

Rodney Dial
Rodney Dial

@Geoffrey Badgley Hi Geoffrey.... here is little more information.

The steel used was not galvanized...it was specially treated and coated for a marine enviroment and was equipped with zinc sacrifical anodes.   Estimated life underwater in the cold Alaskan waters is at least 10 years.  Same stuff as modern ocean vessels.

The water temp in winter in SE Alaska is only a few degrees colder than the winter.  No problem for a person in a dry suit.  In many cases the ocean is warmer than the surrounding air

We open the containers with a abrasive cutting wheel.  Square opening on one end that can be repatched.  Only produces minimal heat and both ends have insulating material

If you noticed on the episode the tubes were placed in protected waters, between islands, protected from Tsunamis.  Also, as mentioned in the episode, a Tsunami is largely a surface wave.  Items at depth are largely undisturbed.  That is why no submarines have ever been damaged in history from earthquakes, tsunamis, including several that were within the great Tsuami that Japan had recently.   Also from the episode you can see that the tube landed upright and even after several tidal actions it was not enough to topple it over.

Thanks

Rodney Dial
Rodney Dial

@Mike Scansaroli   Hi Mike, Yes, I used insulating towels on the cap end (the other end was cool before I loaded it).   PVC is a great idea, but you have to load it with very heavy items or attach weights to it to make it sink.  The size of the steel tube I used makes it just the right weight filled to sink and stick to the bottom.  It didn't move an inch though tidal actions.  To open I just use a grinder with a cutting wheel.   It I cut it right on the end, I can reuse the tube by welding on a new end cap.  Rodney

Charla Wear
Charla Wear

@Rodney Dial @Mike Scansaroli 

Love the idea of dumping them off the coast line here. I think it makes for a unique idea, just make sure you track them all on a map. Plus I bet you can see all of the prime drop off sites from your shop...its all about location..location..location. Love the utility tank by the way, saw it driving by Refuge Cove a couple of weeks ago.