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Grizzly Woods Facts

Fresh out of high school and eager for adventure, a group of American teenagers are out in the Alaskan Wilderness on the trip of a lifetime. They have just spent a month completing a leadership course which prepares them to survive in the wilderness alone.  This is prime grizzly bear country and they must be vigilant  even pee breaks are to be done in groups.  As they walk, they must make noise to prevent surprising a bear. They are each given bear spray, which they store in their packs.

Fresh out of high school and eager for adventure, a group of American teenagers are out in the Alaskan Wilderness on the trip of a lifetime. They have just spent a month completing a leadership course which prepares them to survive in the wilderness alone. This is prime grizzly bear country and they must be vigilant even pee breaks are to be done in groups. As they walk, they must make noise to prevent surprising a bear. They are each given bear spray, which they store in their packs. (View larger version)

Photograph by Getty Images

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  • The term “brown bear” commonly refers to animals found along the coast. Brown bears that found away from the coast and in northern habitats are often called “grizzlies.”

  • There are approximately 30,000 grizzlies living in Alaska.

  • Grizzly bears can a between 6 and 9 feet (2-3m) in length.

  • Grizzlies have better sense of smell than a hound dog. They can smell food 3 miles away.

  • The color of grizzly bear fur can vary from blond to black but grizzlies usually have brown fur with gray tips.

  • A grizzly bear can reach speeds of around 35 miles per hour.

  • Bears are among the only large predators that eat meat and plants on a regular basis. They have large canines for killing prey and large molars for chewing vegetation.

  • A brown bear’s jaw pressure is powerful enough to crush a human head.

  • You are more likely to be attacked by a grizzly bear if you scream out loud, fight back, or run away.

  • Bears tend to be bolder in the dark, and they move about the earth with their nose.

  • Brown bears, larger than black bears, have a more notable shoulder hump, less-protruding ears and longer claws. The long claws are used to dig for roots and to dig up burrows of small mammals.

  • Poachers often kill grizzlies for their hides, but rarely eat the meat as it doesn’t taste very good.

  • For 6 months of the year, and sometimes longer, grizzly bears hibernate due to lack of food in the cold winter months, surviving on fat reserves.

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